motherjones:

Our latest cover story is online:
Meet the Republican Party’s Great New Hope

New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez is petty, vindictive, and weak on policy. Sound familiar? 

Read the whole thing

motherjones:

Our latest cover story is online:

Meet the Republican Party’s Great New Hope

New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez is petty, vindictive, and weak on policy. Sound familiar? 

Read the whole thing

redupnyc:

(via For Victims, Volunteers, a Movement Towards Safer Sex Work - The Chicago Bureau)

So about that death rate… first of all, its a little unclear how the numbers for that murder rate are arrived at, since there is no option for putting “sex worker” on the census, as most sex work is not legally or culturally recognized as work. So the number itself is likely inaccurate.

But more importantly, sex work is almost twice as deadly as being a fisherman BECAUSE it is illegal and stigmatized, BECAUSE the work is largely unregulated and there is no safety standards. When sex workers try to get justice or “complain” about labor and safety practices, no one listens - instead we are further criminalized. This is structural violence - and structural violence kills us at least as often, perhaps even more often, than violent clients and partners.

theuppitynegras:

The Evangelical Orphan Boom

Christian advocates of transnational adoption often claim some 150 million children need homes — even though that figure, derived from a UNICEF report, includes all non-Western children who have lost only one parent, and also any children who live with extended family.

Evangelicals from the Bible Belt to Southern California don wristbands or T-shirts reading “orphan addict” or “serial adopter.” Ministries have emerged to raise money and award grants to help Christians pay the fees (some $30,000 on average, plus travel) associated with transnational adoption.

However well intended, this enthusiasm has exacerbated what has become a boom-and-bust market for children that leaps from country to country. In many cases, the influx of money has created incentives to establish or expand orphanages — and identify children to fill them.

The potential for fraud and abuse is high. Of course, adoption problems aren’t limited to Christian agencies, and they don’t originate with them, but some movement insiders say that evangelicals — whether driven by zeal or naïveté — have had a disproportionate impact on the international adoption system.

Stolen generation

wilsoncenter:

What do Rwanda, Afghanistan, and Iraq beat America at? Having women in congress/parliament

Countries with better representation of women in government than the United States (hat tip to our Women in Public Service Project):

  1. Rwanda - 56%
  2. Andorra - 50%
  3. Cuba - 45%
  4. Sweden - 45%
  5. Seychelles - 44%
  6. Senegal - 43%
  7. Finland - 43%
  8. South Africa - 42%
  9. Nicaragua - 40%
  10. Iceland - 40%
  11. Norway - 40%
  12. Mozambique - 39%
  13. Denmark - 39%
  14. Netherlands - 39%
  15. Costa Rica - 39%
  16. Timor-Leste - 39%
  17. Belgium - 38%
  18. Argentina - 37%
  19. Mexico - 37%
  20. Tanzania - 36%
  21. Spain - 36%
  22. Uganda - 35%
  23. Angola - 34%
  24. Serbia - 33%
  25. Nepal - 33%
  26. Germany - 33%
  27. Macedonia - 33%
  28. Ecuador - 32%
  29. Slovenia - 32%
  30. New Zealand - 32%
  31. Algeria - 32%
  32. Guyana - 31%
  33. Burundi - 31%
  34. Switzerland - 29%
  35. Portugal - 29%
  36. Trinidad and Tobago - 29%
  37. Austria - 28%
  38. Ethiopia - 28%
  39. Afghanistan - 28%
  40. France - 27%
  41. Lesotho - 27%
  42. Tunisia - 27%
  43. Belarus - 27%
  44. South Sudan - 27%
  45. El Salvador - 26%
  46. Bolivia - 25%
  47. Iraq - 25%
  48. Laos - 25%
  49. Canada - 25%
  50. Australia - 25%
  51. Sudan - 25%
  52. Lithuania - 25%
  53. Vietnam - 24%
  54. Namibia - 24%
  55. Kazakhstan - 24%
  56. Singapore - 24%
  57. Liechtenstein - 24%
  58. Croatia - 24%
  59. Poland - 24%
  60. Kyrgyzstan - 23%
  61. Latvia - 23%
  62. Bulgaria - 23%
  63. Philippines - 23%
  64. Pakistan - 23%
  65. United Kingdom - 23%
  66. Malawi - 22%
  67. Mauritania - 22%
  68. Czech Republic - 22%
  69. Eritrea - 22%
  70. Uzbekistan - 22%
  71. Luxembourg - 22%
  72. Peru - 22%
  73. Italy - 21%
  74. Boznia and Herzegovina - 21%
  75. China - 21%
  76. Greece - 21%
  77. Cape Verde - 21%
  78. Estonia - 21%
  79. Dominican Republic - 21%
  80. Cambodia - 20%
  81. Israel - 20%
  82. Moldova - 20%
  83. Bangladesh - 20%
  84. Honduras - 20%
  85. Monaco - 19%
  86. Tajikistan - 19%
  87. Mauritius - 19%
  88. Slovak Republic - 19%
  89. Indonesia - 19%
  90. Sao Tome and Principe - 18%
  91. United States - 18%

(source: World Bank)

policymic:

Banksy’s back

The lower work has been claimed by the mysterious street artist, while the top one employs his signature stencil style. Both are making clever statements about the current state of technology.

Read more

assangistan:

via anarcho-queer:

WikiLeaks: Obama Administration Pressured Haiti’s President To Lower Minimum Wage

A Wikileaks post published on The Nation shows that the Obama Administration fought to keep Haitian wages at 31 cents an hour.

Contractors for Fruit of the Loom, Hanes and Levi’s worked in close concert with the US Embassy when they aggressively moved to block a minimum wage increase for Haitian assembly zone workers, the lowest-paid in the hemisphere, according to secret State Department cables.

It started when Haiti passed a law two years ago raising its minimum wage to 61 cents an hour. According to an embassy cable:

This infuriated American corporations like Hanes and Levi Strauss that pay Haitians slave wages to sew their clothes. They said they would only fork over a seven-cent-an-hour increase, and they got the State Department involved. The U.S. ambassador put pressure on Haiti’s president, who duly carved out a $3 a day minimum wage for textile companies (the U.S. minimum wage, which itself is very low, works out to $58 a day).

Haiti has about 25,000 garment workers. If you paid each of them $2 a day more, it would cost their employers $50,000 per working day, or about $12.5 million a year … As of last year Hanes had 3,200 Haitians making t-shirts for it. Paying each of them two bucks a day more would cost it about $1.6 million a year. Hanesbrands Incorporated made $211 million on $4.3 billion in sales last year.

Thanks to U.S. intervention, the minimum was raised only to 31 cents.

The revelation of US support for low wages in Haiti’s assembly zones was in a trove of 1,918 cables made available to the Haitian weekly newspaper Haïti Liberté by the transparency group WikiLeaks. As part of a collaboration with Haïti Liberté, The Nation is publishing English-language articles based on those cables.

helloimedua:

sixpenceee:

This is beautiful and it’s amazing to me that it had such a positive outcome and not lifelong hateful grudges, which is probably what these attackers deserved. 

FOR MORE PORTRAITS AND THE OFFICIAL WEBPAGE

This is perfect and beautiful and amazing

newsweek:

Newsweek’s staff is comprised of 43.3% female reporters, writers and editors as of today. 

upworthy:

One Group Had A Hypothesis About Sexism. They Made A Bunch Of Pies To Prove It.

Every year, a group of volunteers does an old-fashioned tally: How many of the stories, articles, and reviews in major literary publications are by or about women authors? They turned their tick marks into pie charts, and the VIDA Count was born. The gender imbalance it reveals is so dramatic, there should probably be an episode of “Law & Order” about it. Here are just a few of the ickiest “pies.”

Posted on April 7, 2014

Reblogged from: Newsweek

Source: upworthy

Notes: 529 notes

When did we become a country where the millionaires are jealous of the people on food stamps? A country that thinks teachers and fire fighters are soaking us dry? A country that thinks the richest who are paying the lowest taxes in 80 years are the ones being beaten up?

Who Wants Free Stuff? | Eclectablog (via section9)

Every nation has two cultures: the culture of the oppressed and the culture of the oppressors.

— Amiri Baraka (via queenofthenegroes)

sagginpants-singlemamas:

blackourstory:

satanic2chainz:

blackgirlsbirthedtheearth:

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Sister Ramona Africa, the only adult survivor, speaks on the May 13, 1985 Philadelphia police terror-bombing of the MOVE family house:

They bombed us [on May 13, 1985] because of our unrelenting fight for our family members, known as the MOVE 9, who have been in prison unjustly going on thirty-two years now, as a result of the August 8th, 1978 police attack on MOVE. I just wanted to make that clear. 

In terms of the bombing, after being attacked the way we were, first with four deluge hoses by the fire department and then tons of tear gas, and then being shot at—the police admit to shooting over 10,000 rounds of bullets at us in the first ninety minutes—there was a lull. You know, it was quiet for a little bit. And then, without any warning at all, two members of the Philadelphia Police Department’s bomb squad got in a Pennsylvania state police helicopter and flew over our home and dropped a satchel containing C4, a powerful military explosive that no municipal police department has. They had to get it from the federal government, from the FBI. And without any announcement or warning or anything, they dropped that bomb on the roof of our home. 

Now, at that point, we didn’t know exactly what they had done. We heard the loud explosion. The house kind of shook. But it never entered my mind that they dropped a bomb on us. But the bomb did in fact ignite a fire. And not long after that, it got very, very hot in the house, and the smoke was getting thicker. At first we thought it was tear gas. But as it got thicker, it became clear that this wasn’t tear gas, that this was something else. And then we could hear the trees outside of our house crackling and realized that our home was on fire. And we immediately tried to get our children, our animals, our dogs and cats, and ourselves out of that blazing inferno. 

The adults were hollering out that we’re coming out, we’re bringing the children out. The children were hollering that they were coming out, that we were bringing them out. And we know that the police heard us. But the instant, the very instant, that we were visible to them, you know, trying to come out, they immediately opened fire. We were met with a barrage of police gunfire. And you could see it hitting all around us, all around the house. And it forced us back in to that blazing inferno, several times. And finally, you know, you’re in a position where either you choke to death and burn alive or you possibly are shot to death. 

So we continued to try to get out of that house. And I got out. I got Birdie out. You could hear the shots hitting all around us. A cop grabbed Birdie, took him into custody, grabbed me, they threw me down on the ground and handcuffed, you know, me behind me, in the back of me. And I just knew that everybody else had gotten out. They were right behind me. And I didn’t find out until police took me to the homicide unit of the police administration building that there were no other survivors. 

Every time I come across this it makes me emotional. More people should know about this and be outraged. I don’t care how long ago it was. They dropped a bomb on these people! Fuck anybody who doesn’t feel enraged about that. 

I want everyone to remember that: they opened fire on people trying to flee a burning building

they threw people back into the fire to cover up their crimes

no one ever faced justice for this

Never forget

ISounds a whole lot like terrorism

The idea behind my legislation is simple. If banks get a subsidy, we should quantify it and banks should hold capital sufficient to cover it. If they don’t get a subsidy, the legislation won’t have any impact on them. The process of determining the scope of the subsidy would be transparent and the Federal Reserve would write the formula. If a bank’s shareholders decide that it’s not worth holding capital in reserve to pay for the subsidy, they would be free to downsize their institution.

Rep. Michael Capuano, [D-MA], presenting a bill, H.R. 2266, that would help curb our Too Big To Fail [TBTF] banking culture.

TBTF risk has to be fixed. Taxpayers are hapless. There is no criminal punishment for banks that abuse risk.

If anyone still thinks mortgages serve any interest other than those of the lenders, they are pretty delusional. Requiring banks to limit their risk in the fashion proposed in H.R. 2266, while no magic bullet, could serve as the first baby step toward social responsibility and ethical business conduct.

(via liberalsarecool)

http://dynastylnoire.tumblr.com/post/81226990776/kenobi-wan-obi-did-you-know-that-charles

kenobi-wan-obi:

Did you know that Charles Darwin’s son would hit up the AMNH/ American Museum of Natural History and hold meetings which in some of those meetings he and a group discussed ‘population control’ of minority subjects and were very fond of eugenics and bettering the races by…

newsweek:

WAKE FOREST, N.C. — Janette Simon has four chicken legs and five kids to feed. Her freezer is bare.

And her latest trip to the food pantry yielded little else for dinner this night: a bag of day-old croissants, a box of Corn Flakes, and some canned goods.

She slathers barbecue sauce on the chicken, slides the pan in the oven, and begins her nightly ritual of distracting her five children from hunger. The 44-year-old single mother often skips dinner herself. She hides Ramen noodle packets in her closet to ration food.

She tells her two youngest kids to play outside “so they ain’t thinking about eating.” “That’s what I have to worry about,” she says. “I gotta look at these kids with their sad faces and no food.”

On the 13th of every month, she has counted on seeing a $600 payment on her food-stamp debit card. But now, that payment is a month late. Simon and thousands like her in North Carolina had enough to worry about before a computer glitch began to fray this basic part of the social safety net. Last July, government computers across the state repeatedly crashed, preventing caseworkers from processing food stamp applications and recertifications for weeks.

Eight months later, North Carolina officials are still scrambling to clear the resulting backlog.

How A Government Computer Glitch Forced Thousands Of Families To Go Hungry

Posted on March 30, 2014

Reblogged from: Newsweek

Notes: 4,583 notes

smorgasbaby:

Kiev, largest city of Ukraine, before the violent demonstrations and now.

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